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Are you looking for different discussion questions to use for your book discussion group meeting? While Things Fall Apart seems simply written, there are many different aspects of the book, including daily life of the Igbo culture, how colonialism changed traditional cultures, and the roles killing and suicide take in cultures.

This list of alternative sources for finding discussion questions will help you to not only discover great new questions, but in some cases will provide you with questions to ask about Achebe's writing style, give you a pronunciation guide to characters in the novel, and provide you with a synopsis of the different chapters.

Reading Group Guides.Com
www.readinggroupguides.com/guides/things_fall_apart.asp
This web page has the traditional publisher - created discussion questions for book discussion groups. You will find a brief description of the book, 18 discussion questions, and critical praise for the book. This is a great place to start for basic discussion questions.

Central Oregon Community College's web page
web.cocc.edu/cagatucci/classes/hum211/achebtfa.htm
This is a 9 page study guide from a college humanities course. Useful because it is arranged by the three parts of the novel, each part contains questions to use for book discussion groups, points out parts of the novel to think about and re-read, and provides questions to think about Achebe's writing style, his role in African literature, and Achebe's role as an African storyteller. This web page has very detailed questions and would be great for a group that wants to do an in-depth discussion of the book. In addition, the study guide has a complete copy of Yeats' poem, The Second Coming, which Achebe used a line from to create the title, Things Fall Apart.

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology's web page
www.sdsmt.edu/courses/is/hum375/achebe.html
While this study guide only has a few questions for book groups to use, this web page has literary criticism of the author and an analysis of the novel. This study guide is useful in that it discusses two important aspects of the novel - women in the novel, and the role of epic heroism, including the role of suicide.

Teachit.Co.Uk
www.teachit.co.uk/pdf/1569.pdf
This British online study guide is useful for its great pronunciation chart of all of the characters in the novel. It also has a map of Africa and Nigeria so readers can visualize the area they are reading about. While not as useful as other online study guides for finding discussion questions, this web page does give a few questions for readers to think about while they are reading each chapter. This would be a useful companion for a book discussion group leader to use while reading the book.

Lawrence University's web page
www.lawrence.edu/dept/freshman_studies/resource/fsachebe.html
A ten page study guide for college freshman, this web page provides many basic questions for an adult book discussion group to use. Topics include the role of family, missionaries and colonialists, the role of religion, and analysis on the main character, Okonkwo. The study guide also has also the full text of the Yeats' poem, as well as a pronunciation guide to the characters of the novel.

Washington State University's web page
www.wsu.edu:8000/~brians/anglophone/achebe.html
Broken down into sections for each of the 25 chapters, this online study guide gives a general introduction to the novel and then offers questions for each chapter. More of a guide to use while initially reading the novel, this web page has different discussion questions for groups to consider, such as the role of night on people, the role of spirits and evil in the novel, and how Okonkwo can be viewed as a defiant hero.

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Last Modified: July 11, 2005
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